Archive from 1980, Parade, Margate, 15-21 February 2013

Archive from 1980 – 30 drawings

Typewriter (Copperbox)/Margate Trophy/Tuk-Tuks (Sri Lanka)/LNER Clock/Desert Boots and Bowling Shoes/Oblivion Button/Literary Dogs/P for Petanque/Badges (1989)/Antarctic Explorers – Parts 1 & 2/Europena Roller/Fiske, Gray, Eagan & O’Brien/Assorted Badges/SPICA/Boots/Shears & Leather Working Tools (Cherchbi)/24 Brogues/WWII Medals/ The Ambassador (Rijksmuseum)/Two Typewritwes/ Captain’s Cap/ Dansette (back/inside)/Mod Shoes/Brian Haw’s HatAmundsen South Pole Expediton Watch/ACME Whistles/Ocean Falls (British Columbia)/Watercolour Box/Big Russain Badge. 

Exhibition view 1

 Exhibition view 2

 Exhibition view 1

 

View 4

 

The Margate Postcards – 40 postcards  celebrating/commemorating Margate, past and present.

Margate Postcards 1

Margate Postcards 2

MP4

Bird Pyramid

1 Fieldfare

2 Longtails

3 Buntings

4 Warblers

5 Tits

Bird Pyramid

 

Great Bustard

Great Bustard or otis tarda (2011)

Watercolour on paper, 148 x 210mm.

The Great Bustard is a large bird in the Bustard family, unrelated to other large bird species such as turkeys or geese. Great Bustards can (and do) fly, despite being the heaviest flying animal alive today. Great Bustards can be found across Europe, as far south as Spain and as far to the north as the Russian steppes. Most members of the Bustard family are smaller than the Great Bustard which is dwarfed only by the Kori Bustard. Male Great Bustards grow about 30% larger than the females, reaching up to 1 meter tall and weighing up to 16Kg (the heaviest recorded Great Bustard weighed in at 21Kg). The conservation status of the Great Bustard is listed as vulnerable, with populations in many countries being in decline and having been extinct in the UK for over 180 years.

http://greatbustard.org/

ABP: Great Reed Warbler

Great Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus arundinaceus (2012)

Watercolour on paper, 210 x 297mm.

The Great Reed Warbler is a huge warbler, 50% bigger than a Reed Warbler and almost as big as a Redwing. Most warblers move delicately through the reeds but this one crashes around clumsily. In plumage it looks quite similar to a Reed Warbler but it has a more obvious eyestripe and the larger size and stronger bill are usually obvious.

http://www.birdguides.com/species/species.asp?sp=136094

ABP: Kew Parakeet

Kew Parakeet, Psittacula krameri (2012)

Watercolour on paper, 210 x 297mm.

The UK’s only naturalised parrot – it is large, long-tailed and green with a red beak and a pink and black ring around its face and neck. In flight it has pointed wings, a long tail and very steady, direct flight. Often found in flocks, numbering hundreds at a roost site, it can be very noisy.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/r/ringneckedparakeet/

ABP: Dotterel

image

Dotterel, Eudromias morinellus (2012)

Watercolour on paper, 210 x 297mm.

This medium-sized member of the plover family is unusual in that the adult female is brighter than the male – an indication of their role-reversal in raising the young. Adults have largely grey-brown upperparts and bright chestnut belly, with a white chest band, throat and eyestripe, the latter contrasting with a dark cap. On spring migration they are often seen in groups, or ‘trips’, at traditional stopping places.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/d/dotterel/index.aspx

Birds of Shore and Sea #7

Common sandpiper or Actitis hypoleucos (2011)

Watercolour on paper, 210 × 297mm.

A smallish wader with contrasting brown upperparts and white underparts.  It habitually bobs up and down, known as ‘teetering’, and has a distinctive flight with stiff, bowed wings.  Its presence is often betayed by its three-note call which it gives as it flies off.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/c/commonsandpiper/index.aspx

 

Birds of Shore and Sea #6

Puffin or Fratercula arctica (2011)

Watercolour on paper, 210 × 297mm.

An unmistakable bird with its black back and white underparts, and distinctive black head with large pale cheeks and a tall, flattened, brightly-coloured bill. Its comical appearance is heightened by its red and black eye-markings and bright orange legs. Used as a symbol for books and other items, this clown among seabirds is one of the world’s favourite birds.  With half of the UK population at only a few sites it is an Amber List species.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/p/puffin/index.aspx